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Ipomoea ommannei

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A wild plant by SA Plants, Wikimedia.org.


The flowers by SA Plants, Wikimedia.org.


The leaves by Athol Ferguson, Inaturalist.org.

Author: 

Alfred Barton Rendle, 1902

Family: 

CONVOLVULACEAE

Origin: 

Botswana, Mozambique, NW South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Soil: 

Sandy - Grit

Water: 

Medium

Sun: 

Maximum

Thickness: 

25 Centimetres

Height: 

200 Centimetres

Flower: 

Bright Rose-Magenta

Propagate: 

Seeds

Names: 

Ox Morning Glory

Synonyms: 

By mistake?: Ipomoea ommanneyi.

This member of the Convolvulaceae family was given this name by Alfred Barton Rendle in 1902. It is found in Botswana, Mozambique, north-western South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe. It is growing in a well drained sandy or gritty soil with some water and lots of sun. The caudex can grow to 25 centimetres in diameter, one meter in length, the vines to two metres in length. The flowers are bright rose-magenta.

The generic name Ipomoea is derived from the Greek ἴψ, ἰπός; íps, ipós, meaning 'woodworm', and ὅμοιος; hómoios, meaning 'resembling'. It referring to their twining habit. The species name after Henry Travers Ommanney, 1849-1936, a British civil servant and army officer in India. After his retirement from the Indian Civil Service he settled in South Africa. He joined the South African Mounted Irregular Forces and made plant collections during the time he was stationed at Johannesburg. His original plant material was sent mainly to the British Museum.


Partly exposed caudex by  Richard Gill, Inaturalist.org.