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GUYANA    INFO & DIARY  1

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 GENERAL INFO (Jump to Diary)
The Co-operative Republic of Guyana, also known as British Guyana or simply Guyana is an unitary presidential republic in the north of South America. It is bordered by Venezuela (who does not recognise it), Suriname, Brazil and the North Atlantic Sea. It covers 214.970 square kilometres, and is the home of 735.909 citizens. As a former British colonial, the habitants are a mix from others. 57% are Christians, 28% Hindi and 7% Muslim.
The currency is Guyanese dollar, worse 0,03 Danish Krone and 0,0042. The GDP is US$3.456 billion.
The climate is Equatorial in the northern half, a few central areas are Monsoon while the southern half is Tropical savannah. I will mainly be travelling in the Equatorial and Monsoon areas. Where the temperature is quite stabile, the rainy seasons are May to August and again November to January.
Guyana have quite some habitats with coastal, marine, littoral, estuarine palustrine, mangrove, riverine, lacustrine, swamp, savanna, white sand forest, brown sand forest, montane, cloud forest, moist lowland and dry evergreen scrub forests.
Due to the lack of roads, I will mainly be exploring the northern, costal areas and a narrow stretch south. But; the inland native and relatively undisturbed forests does hold a lot of interesting animals and plants.
I would love to see the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus), some of the armadillos like Greater long-nosed armadillo (Dasypus kappleri), the Southern naked-tailed armadillo (Cabassous unicinctus) and Giant armadillo (Priodontes maximus), some of the sloths like Pale-throated three-toed sloth (Bradypus tridactylus), Linnaeus's two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus) and Southern tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla). Here are quite some primates like Red-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas), Tufted capuchin (Cebus apella), Weeper capuchin (Cebus olivaceus), Common squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus), White-faced saki (Pithecia pithecia), Red-backed bearded saki (Chiropotes chiropotes) and Red-faced spider monkey (Ateles paniscus). Here are Brazilian porcupine (Coendou prehensilis), Red-rumped agouti (Dasyprocta leporina), Red acouchi (Myoprocta acouchy), Lowland paca (Cuniculus paca) and a lot of bats!
Among the larger predators are Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), Oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus), Margay (Leopardus wiedii), Cougar (Puma concolor), Jaguarundi (Puma yagouaroundi), Jaguar (Panthera onca). To name a few dogs; Crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), Bush dog (Speothos venaticus), Crab-eating raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus), South American coati (Nasua nasua), Kinkajou (Potos flavus) and Striped hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus semistriatus). I doubt I see it, but here are some Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris), where I might catch a glimpse of one of the many opossums.
Just like the fauna, the flora is real rich. Approximately 80% of the land is covered by tropical rainforest of which most is still intact. Realising I will have a real hard time finding anything, I have not made a lost of plants I will be looking for - although I would love to see the Queen Victoria's water lily (Victoria amazonica) in the wild.

DIARY
Well, the plan is made, the eager to go high, but work prevents me so far...

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